11 June 2019, 11:50

Mauro Ottolini & Fabrizio Bosso

MAURO OTTOLINI & FABRIZIO BOSSO “Storyville Story” with VANESSA TAGLIABUE YORKE, PAOLO BIRRO GLAUCO BENEDETTI, PAOLO MAPPA Storyville Story is inspired by New Orleans and its immense cultural heritage and, in particular, the origins of jazz. For several years, Mauro Ottolini and Fabrizio Bosso have thought of doing something together, and Ottolini’s proposal to make […]
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UmbriaJazz

MAURO OTTOLINI & FABRIZIO BOSSO “Storyville Story”
with VANESSA TAGLIABUE YORKE, PAOLO BIRRO
GLAUCO BENEDETTI, PAOLO MAPPA

Storyville Story is inspired by New Orleans and its immense cultural heritage and, in particular, the origins of jazz. For several years, Mauro Ottolini and Fabrizio Bosso have thought of doing something together, and Ottolini’s proposal to make a musical journey to the (re)discovery of New Orleans seemed to the trumpet player from Turin to be the right way.

Ottolini, whom the Umbria Jazz audience¬† knows well because, particularly in recent years, he has often been present on the festival’s programmes and always with different shows: from the Licaones to the homage paid by Simona Molinari to Ella Fitzgerald, from the great event dedicated to Luigi Tenco and the songwriters, to the soundtracks of Buster Keaton’s silent films.

Bosso is also a regular guest of the festival, where he has presented practically all the different formulas he has created in recent years, from his now classic quartet to big bands.

With Ottolini and Bosso are also Vanessa Tagliabue Yorke, Paolo Birro, Glauco Benedetti, Paolo Mappa.

Why “Storyville Story”? Storyville was the hottest neighborhood in New Orleans, where nightclubs, caf√©s, gambling dens and brothels were concentrated. Its soundtrack was the jazz of the great trumpet players or of the stride pianists. Legends flourished in this concentration of excesses where Puritan America literally disappeared. The music was really legendary, with great soloists, impressive blues singers, vaudeville orchestras, marching bands, composers like William Christopher Handy who wrote themes that everyone would later play. Such as St. Louis Blues, for example.

Storyville Story is the musical re-enactment of this epic which, at one point, ended because Storyville was closed and completely reconstructed and jazz, too, and its musicians, emigrated to the cities of the north. The legend, however, continues, and this show, through those pieces transcribed and arranged by Ottolini, intends to revive it.