Allan Harris "Kate's Soulfood" Band feat. Grégoire Maret | Umbria Jazz

Allan Harris “Kate’s Soulfood” Band feat. Grégoire Maret

A fan favorite at Umbria Jazz with a new story to tell, Harris presents his new album, “Kate’s Soulfood,” a cross-section of America. Allan grew up in Brooklyn and would always go to visit his maternal aunt Kate Ingram on weekends. She owned a popular luncheonette in Harlem, on Frederick Douglass Boulevard and West 126th […]
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A fan favorite at Umbria Jazz with a new story to tell, Harris presents his new album, “Kate’s Soulfood,” a cross-section of America. Allan grew up in Brooklyn and would always go to visit his maternal aunt Kate Ingram on weekends. She owned a popular luncheonette in Harlem, on Frederick Douglass Boulevard and West 126th Street, just a stone’s throw from the Apollo Theater. It was more than just a place to eat, aunt Kate’s Home Cooking was a nexus for residents, ordinary people, and artists of all kinds, especially jazz musicians. The cover photo of a famous Blue Note record shows Jimmy Smith in front of the diner’s entrance. “Home Cooking” is the title. Harris reminds people of that place and that atmosphere of New York in great excitement with Harlem in the heart. The unrivaled harmonica player Grégoire Maret is the guest member of the band in Orvieto.

Allan Harris gained recognition after winning the DownBeat Poll for “Rising star jazz vocalist”. This title is the official consecration of a star in America, but the audience of Umbria Jazz got there first. Harris is well known here for his multiple performances at both summer and winter editions of the Festival. A singer and guitarist, he is the quintessential jazz vocalist. His world is that of the crooners, a genre that today is not very prolific, at least at these levels. Harris’ style is low-key, never over the top, always elegant. In a word, classic. Harris has a profound knowledge of jazz vocalism. Still, his tributes to Eddie Jefferson, Tony Bennett, or Nat “King” Cole, the patron saint of crooners, have never been a mere nostalgic operation but rather the release of new life in a vocalism that is part of jazz history.