New Year's Eve Dinner | Palazzo del Popolo | Umbria Jazz

Accordi Disaccordi and Anais Drago

The Anthony Paule Soul Orchestra

Allan Harris “Kate’s Soulfood” Band feat. Grégoire Maret

Fri, 31 December - hours 20:30
Palazzo del Popolo – Sala Expo
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Accordi Disaccordi and Anais Drago

Accordi Disaccordi is the name of a trio (solo guitar, rhythm guitar, double bass) that has carved out an original role on the Italian jazz scene, starting from the repertoire combining swing and gypsy. Behind that music, people naturally perceive the majestic shadow of a jazz legend who invented that genre: Django Reinhardt. The trio performs classic Italian and international songs in a modern key, and original songs, taking people back to the ‘30s. It is not just gypsy. The recent album “Decanter” is a clear example of their current music, constantly evolving and recalling multiple influences. The guest of Accordi Disaccordi (as was at Umbria Jazz 19) is violinist Anais Drago, ranked among the Top 10 best new talents of the 2020 Musica Jazz Poll. Her eclecticism allows her to move with ease among jazz, rock, world music, and experimentation. People should keep a close eye on her.
UmbriaJazz

The Anthony Paule Soul Orchestra

True soul experts form the band: they all boast prestigious collaborations, starting from their leader, who worked and recorded with Boz Scaggs, Charlie Musselwhite, Johnny Adams, Maria Muldaur, The Johnny Nocturne Band. New drummer Kevin Hayes has been working with Robert Cray for twenty years. Plus, he recorded with B.B. King, John Lee Hooker, and Van Morrison. Trumpeter Bill Ortiz was part of Santana’s band, and saxophonist Charles McNeal is one of the Bay Area’s most in-demand session men. They became a stable band in Italy in 2015 for the Poretta Soul Festival. The idea was to form a band specialized in “old-school” soul. The band immediately proved to work and has become a group that can play great stunning and immersive black music (soul, blues, R&B), with a significant discography. The album “Soul For Your Blues” was nominated for two BMAs, and “After A While” made with Wee Willie Walker received five nominations in 2018. “Not In My Lifetime” came out recently, recorded by the Anthony Paule Soul Orchestra a few days before Wee Willie Walker’s death, and produced by the legendary Jim Gaines. Singer Terrie Odabi joins the band in Orvieto. The Oakland native has been defined as the most dynamic blues and soul woman to have emerged in the Bay Area since Etta James. Few vocalists own the stage like her, thanks to an overwhelming physical and vocal presence. Great jazz trombonist Steve Turre calls her “a jewel from the Bay Area”.
UmbriaJazz

Allan Harris “Kate’s Soulfood” Band feat. Grégoire Maret

A fan favorite at Umbria Jazz with a new story to tell, Harris presents his new album, “Kate’s Soulfood,” a cross-section of America. Allan grew up in Brooklyn and would always go to visit his maternal aunt Kate Ingram on weekends. She owned a popular luncheonette in Harlem, on Frederick Douglass Boulevard and West 126th Street, just a stone’s throw from the Apollo Theater. It was more than just a place to eat, aunt Kate’s Home Cooking was a nexus for residents, ordinary people, and artists of all kinds, especially jazz musicians. The cover photo of a famous Blue Note record shows Jimmy Smith in front of the diner’s entrance. “Home Cooking” is the title. Harris reminds people of that place and that atmosphere of New York in great excitement with Harlem in the heart. The unrivaled harmonica player Grégoire Maret is the guest member of the band in Orvieto. Allan Harris gained recognition after winning the DownBeat Poll for “Rising star jazz vocalist”. This title is the official consecration of a star in America, but the audience of Umbria Jazz got there first. Harris is well known here for his multiple performances at both summer and winter editions of the Festival. A singer and guitarist, he is the quintessential jazz vocalist. His world is that of the crooners, a genre that today is not very prolific, at least at these levels. Harris' style is low-key, never over the top, always elegant. In a word, classic. Harris has a profound knowledge of jazz vocalism. Still, his tributes to Eddie Jefferson, Tony Bennett, or Nat “King” Cole, the patron saint of crooners, have never been a mere nostalgic operation but rather the release of new life in a vocalism that is part of jazz history.